All photos and text are property of Dave Forney and may not be used without express permission.

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Winter in the Tropics - Part III

This is the third and last in my little three part series, "Winter in the Tropics".  This last post features a few random shots of the beauty that is to be found in the reef itself--mostly the plants and corals.  If you didn't get a chance yet, make sure to check out the first and second posts in this series. 









The dazzling colors and seemingly infinite variations are always mesmerizing to me.  It's like floating, nearly weightless, above and through a royal garden, only from a different world.




These last three shots feature Christmas Tree Worms, or Spirobranchus giganteus, growing in coral.  They come in a myriad colors.  The part you see sticking out always sports two, fan-like, Christmas tree-shaped structures that serve as both part of the respiration system and food collection utensil.  The worm itself is inside the coral and never comes out.  When you approach too close to the "Christmas trees" they suddenly disappear into the coral.  If you wait patiently, several minutes later they will cautiously reappear.  It's rather tough to get close enough to take a nice picture, because their so jittery.




Well, that's all for this edition of "Winter in the Tropics."  Hope you enjoyed it.  This weekend the family and I, along with two other MAF families are going into two villages in the Krayan region of Northeast Kalimantan, right along the Malaysian border.  I'll be showing films and sharing a bit, and the others will be involved in various aspects of New Years / Christmas services.  Stay tuned, I'm sure I'll post something about that trip upon our return.

2 comments:

ismile4christ said...

Who says kings aren't creative or artistic? Our King is both! He sure knows how to take care of His gardens! Breathtaking!

Shannon said...

So intriguing that God would save some of His most unique and beautiful designs for under the ocean waters, where it would rarely be seen.